Category Archives: Diabetes

Sanofi/Verily joint venture to fight diabetes

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Big pharma + big tech/data partnerships continue to proliferate.

Onduo is a Sanofi/Verily joint venture that will use each company’s expertise to help manage diabetes  — Sanofi’s drugs  plus Verily’s software, data analysis, and devices. CEO Josh Riff and has not announced a project pipeline, as they are taking “a thoughtful approach to finding lasting solutions.”

Sutter Health and Allegheny Health Network will  be the first systems to test Onduo solutions.


ApplySci’s 6th   Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley  –  February 7-8 2017 @ Stanford   |   Featuring:   Vinod Khosla – Tom Insel – Zhenan Bao – Phillip Alvelda – Nathan Intrator – John Rogers – Mary Lou Jepsen – Vivek Wadhwa – Miguel Nicolelis – Roozbeh Ghaffari – Unity Stoakes

GSK/Verily “biolectronic medicine” partnership for disease management

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Galvani Biolectronics is a Verily/GSK company, created to accelerate the research, development and commercialization of bioelectronic medicines. The goal is to find solutions to manage chronic diseases, such as arthritis, diabetes, and asthma, using  miniaturized electronics.  Implanted devices would  modify electrical signals that pass along nerves, including irregular impulses that occur in illness.

Initial work will focus on developing precision devices for inflammatory, metabolic and endocrine disorders, including type 2 diabetes, where substantial evidence already exists in animal models.

Every major pharmaceutical company (globally) attended  ApplySci’s recent Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech conferences in San Francisco and New York.  We believe that partnerships similar to the Verily/GSK venture will proliferate — and that they will improve the lives of those with chronic diseases.


Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley – February 7-8, 2017 @ Stanford University

“Artificial pancreas” uses sensor + app monitoring system

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University Hospital of Montpellier researchers, led by Eric Renard, are developing a sensor/app “artificial pancreas” system for diabetics.

The sensor continuously monitors glucose.  The data is sent to a phone, where an algorithm calculates insulin needed, and to a pump, which then delivers the correct amount of insulin.

So far, the system has only been tested on 21 patients for 1 month, where the results were promising.  Obviously, much more research is needed. The next stage will involve 240 child and adult patients, who will use the device for 6 months.

Contact lens/eyeglass system monitors blood sugar, dispenses drugs

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Pohang University’s Sae Kwang Han and Do Hee Keum have developed a contact lens/ eyeglass combination  to monitor diabetes and dispense drugs as needed.  The glasses wirelessly power and communicate with the drug-releasing lens, that monitors glucose concentration in tears.  An LED alarm lights up when sugar levels are very high. The lens can be worn for one month.

A user can  tell the eyeglasses to send a drug-releasing signal to the chip with voice commands. A control circuit is being created to automate the process,  deciding independently when medicine is needed. To release drugs, the chip draws on one of ten drug reservoirs chambers that are carved into the hydrogel, and covered with a thin gold electrode membrane. The voltage dissolves the membrane and releases the drug.


Wearable Tech + Digital Health NYC – June 7, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

NeuroTech NYC – June 8, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

 

Study: Graphene patch monitors glucose, delivers insulin

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MC10 and Seoul National University researchers, led by Dae-Hyeong Kim, have created a prototype skin patch that could both monitor blood glucose levels and administer insulin to diabetics.  This is the first time that monitoring and drug deivery have been combined.

The graphene and gold mesh patch measures humidity, glucose, pH, and temperature in sweat. While the technology has only been tested on mice, it has shown that it is able to reduce blood glucose levels.  We look forward to the results of human trials.

MC10 co-founder and VP of Technology Roozbeh Ghaffari is a featured speaker at ApplySci’s Wearable Tech + Digital Health conference on April 5th in San Francisco.  He will discuss the future of less invasive, more precise approaches to disease management.


Wearable Tech + Digital Health San Francisco – April 5, 2016 @ the Mission Bay Conference Center

NeuroTech San Francisco – April 6, 2016 @ the Mission Bay Conference Center

Wearable Tech + Digital Health NYC – June 7, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

NeuroTech NYC – June 8, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

 

Smart socks sense pain, pressure in diabetic neuropathy

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SenseGo smart socks have multiple sensors that monitor  pressure from poor posture, over-exertion, or ill-fitting shoes, all which could lead to diabetic foot ulcers.  Pressure points are registered as electrical signals, and relayed to an app which  informs the patient of a developing risk.

The washable sensor socks, developed by Hebrew University professor Yaakov Nahmias, can compensate for damaged nerve sensations,  providing patients with data on pain that they are unable to feel.  Failure to treat these issues could  lead to foot ulcers, sores, or wounds that do not heal, hence the benefit of this “early warning” system.


Wearable Tech + Digital Health San Francisco – April 5, 2016 @ the Mission Bay Conference Center

NeuroTech San Francisco – April 6, 2016 @ the Mission Bay Conference Center

Wearable Tech + Digital Health NYC – June 7, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

NeuroTech NYC – June 8, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

 

Glucose monitoring breath test

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Applied Nanodetectors is in the early stages of developing a noninvasive breath sensor for diabetics to monitor daily glucose levels.  By measuring the levels of volatile organic compounds in breath, if accurate, this could replace finger pricking for disease sufferers, and create a simple diagnostic test.

The company has a related product that monitors the concentration of exhaled trace gas chemicals in an asthma patient’s breath, before symptoms develop, for early warning of attacks.

This, and similar technologies (see ApplySci, 1/11/16), could lead to the incorporation of medical grade sensors into smartphones, which could enable continuous monitoring of multiple conditions.


Wearable Tech + Digital Health San Francisco – April 5, 2016 @ the Mission Bay Conference Center

NeuroTech San Francisco – April 6, 2016 @ the Mission Bay Conference Center

Wearable Tech + Digital Health NYC – June 7, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

NeuroTech NYC – June 8, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

 

AI for diabetes management

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Novo Nordisk  and IBM Watson are partnering to create an AI system to help diabetes patients better manage their disease.

Data from continuous blood sugar monitors will be analyzed and used to inform treatment decisions, such as insulin dosage.  Food intake, exercise and the timing and dosage of insulin injections could also be added to the equation.

The company believes that incorporating large amounts of data into self-care decisions can enable better choices.


Wearable Tech + Digital Health San Francisco – April 5, 2016 @ the Mission Bay Conference Center

NeuroTech San Francisco – April 6, 2016 @ the Mission Bay Conference Center

Wearable Tech + Digital Health NYC – June 7, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

NeuroTech NYC – June 8, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

 

Needle-free blood draw + smartwatch

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Google has filed a patent for a “needle-free blood draw” system that could be incorporated into a wearable.

The filing describes a machine that sends a pulse of gas into a barrel containing a “micro-particle” that can puncture the skin and draw a small drop of blood.

This could dramatically improve the management of diabetes, and continues Google’s diabetes initiative.  The company is  currently developing smart contact lenses and cloud-connected sensors to help monitor glucose.


ApplySci presents:

Wearable Tech + Digital Health San Francisco – April 5, 2016 @ the Mission Bay Conference Center

NeuroTech San Francisco – April 6, 2016 @ the Mission Bay Conference Center

Wearable Tech + Digital Health NYC  – June 7, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

NeuroTech NYC – June 8, 2016 @ the  New York Academy of Sciences

External power supply for Google contact lens

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Power efficiency in wearables is key to continuous, accurate monitoring, for both medical and fitness applications.

Google has filed a patent application suggesting  that an external device will power the sensor of its contact lens, and it could be handheld or embedded into a companion wearable.

The application states that “an external reader device or ‘reader’ can radiate radio frequency radiation to power the sensor. The reader may thereby control the operation of the sensing platform by controlling the supply of power to the sensing platform. In some examples, the reader can operate to intermittently interrogate the sensing platform to provide a reading by radiating sufficient radiation to power the sensing platform to obtain a measurement and communicate the result. The reader can also store the sensor results communicated by the sensing platform. In this way, the reader can acquire a series of analyte concentration measurements over time without continuously powering the sensing platform. The reader could also be built into eyeglasses, jewelry headband, head cover , earpiece, [or] other clothing so that it could continually power the lens.”

Le Temps reports that Novartis and Google plan to start testing their smart contact lens for people with presbyopia in 2016.