3D printed skin, with blood vessels

Pankaj Karande and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute colleagues have developed 3D printed living skin, with blood vessels. which could integrate with host cells in grafts.

Until now, a significant barrier to integration has been the absence of a functioning vascular system.

Karande previously made two types of living human cells into “bio-inks,” and print them into a skin-like structure. He now includes human endothelial cells, which line the inside of blood vessels, and human pericyte cells, which wrap around the endothelial cells — with animal collagen and other structural cells typically found in a skin graft.

The cells start communicating and forming a biologically relevant vascular structure within the span of a few weeks. 

Karande said more work will need to be done to address the challenges associated with burn patients, which include the loss of nerve and vascular endings. But the grafts his team has created bring researchers closer to helping people with more discrete issues, like diabetic or pressure ulcers.

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3D-bioprinted human skin can replace animal testing, potentially be used in burns

José Luis Jorcano at Universidad Carlos III de Madrid has developed a 3D bioprinter capable of replicating the structure of skin. The human-like  skin that is produced  includes an epidermal layer that protects against the environment, and a collagen-producing dermis that provides elasticity and strength.

The bioink material  contains human plasma, and  primary human fibroblasts and keratinocytes obtained from biopsies.

Currently, 100 cm2 of the printed skin  is able to be produced in 35 minutes.

ApplySci’s 6th  Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley  –  February 7-8 2017 @ Stanford   |   Featuring:   Vinod Khosla – Tom Insel – Zhenan Bao – Phillip Alvelda – Nathan Intrator – John Rogers – Roozbeh Ghaffari –Tarun Wadhwa – Eythor Bender – Unity Stoakes – Mounir Zok – Sky Christopherson – Marcus Weldon – Krishna Shenoy – Karl Deisseroth – Shahin Farshchi – Casper de Clercq – Mary Lou Jepsen – Vivek Wadhwa – Dirk Schapeler – Miguel Nicolelis

Electric fields induce nanoscale deficits to rejuvenate skin

Harvard and Tel Aviv University researchers have developed a non-invasive tissue stimulation technique, utilizing microsecond-pulsed, high-voltage, non-thermal electric fields, to produce scarless skin rejuvenation.  Already effective in tumor removal and wound disinfection, the technique may revolutionize the treatment of degenerative skin diseases.

Current skin therapies use  physical and chemical methods to affect cells and the extracellular matrix, but induce scarring. Pulsed electric fields only affect the cell membrane, preserving the extracellular matrix architecture and releasing multiple growth factors to spark new cell and tissue growth. By inducing nanoscale defects on the cell membranes, electric fields cause the death of a small number of cells in affected areas. The released growth factors increase the metabolism of the remaining cells, generating new tissue.