Category Archives: Wearables

Tony Chahine on human presence, reimagined | ApplySci @ Stanford

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Myant‘s Tony Chahine reimagined human presence at ApplySci’s recent Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech conference at Stanford:


Join ApplySci at the 9th Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech Boston conference on September 24, 2018 at the MIT Media Lab.  Speakers include:  Rudy Tanzi – Mary Lou Jepsen – George ChurchRoz PicardNathan IntratorKeith JohnsonJuan EnriquezJohn MattisonRoozbeh GhaffariPoppy Crum – Phillip Alvelda Marom Bikson

REGISTRATION RATES INCREASE JUNE 29TH

Non-invasive glucose monitoring patch

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Richard Guy and University of Bath colleagues have created a non-invasive, adhesive patch, to measure glucose levels through the skin without a finger-prick blood test.

The patch draws glucose from fluid between cells across hair follicles, accessed individually via an array of miniature sensors using a small electric current. The glucose collects in tiny reservoirs and is measured. Readings can be taken every 10 to 15 minutes over several hours. Calibration with a blood sample is not required.

The goal is the development of a low-cost, wearable sensor that sends regular, clinically relevant glucose measurements to one’s phone or watch, with alerts when action is required.


Join ApplySci at the 9th Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech Boston conference – September 25, 2018 at the MIT Media Lab

 

Video: Roz Picard on wrist-sensed stress, seizure & brain data

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Recorded at ApplySci’s Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech Boston conference on September 19th at the MIT Media Lab


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech Silicon Valley on February 26-27, 2018 at Stanford University. Speakers include:  Vinod Khosla – Justin Sanchez – Brian Otis – Bryan Johnson – Zhenan Bao – Nathan Intrator – Carla Pugh – Jamshid Ghajar – Mark Kendall – Robert Greenberg – Darin Okuda – Jason Heikenfeld – Bob Knight – Phillip Alvelda – Paul Nuyujukian –  Peter Fischer – Tony Chahine – Shahin Farshchi – Ambar Bhattacharyya – Adam D’Augelli – Juan-Pablo Mas – Michael Eggleston

Registration rates increase today, December 1st

FDA approved EKG band monitors heart activity via Apple Watch

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AliveCor’s Kardia EKG band is the first medical accessory to receive FDA approval for use with the Apple Watch.

Unlike the optical-based sensor built into the Apple Watch, EKG is considered the most accurate way to record heart activity. AliveCor claims that Kardia is a  medical grade heart rate monitor that can identify abnormal heart rhythms such as atrial fibrillation, quickly. It could also detect palpitations, shortness of breath and irregular heart rate, which could be signifiers of stroke.

While wearing the Apple Watch-attached band, users put their fingers on the sensor to receive a report of their heart activity.  This simple interface is easy to use, and the frequent measurements can be sent directly to one’s doctor.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech Silicon Valley on February 26-27, 2018 at Stanford University. Speakers include:  Vinod Khosla – Justin Sanchez – Brian Otis – Bryan Johnson – Zhenan Bao – Nathan Intrator – Carla Pugh – Jamshid Ghajar – Mark Kendall – Robert Greenberg – Darin Okuda – Jason Heikenfeld – Bob Knight – Phillip Alvelda – Paul Nuyujukian –  Peter Fischer – Tony Chahine – Shahin Farshchi – Ambar Bhattacharyya – Adam D’Augelli – Juan-Pablo Mas

Registration rates increase Friday, December 1st

Small, foam hearable captures heart data

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In a small study, Danilo Mandic from Imperial College London has shown that his hearable can be used to capture heart data. The device detected heart pulse by sensing the dilation and constriction of tiny blood vessels in the ear canal, using the mechanical part of the electro-mechanical sensor. The hearable is made of foam and molds to the shape of the ear. The goal is a comfortable and discreet continuous monitor that will enable physicians to receive extensive data. In addition to the device’s mechanical sensors, Mandic, a signal processing experter, claims that electrical sensors detect brain activity that could  monitor sleep, epilepsy, and drug delivery, and be used in personal authentication and cyber security.

Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech Silicon Valley on February 26-27, 2018 at Stanford University. Speakers include:  Vinod Khosla – Justin Sanchez – Brian Otis – Bryan Johnson – Zhenan Bao – Nathan Intrator – Carla Pugh – Jamshid Ghajar – Mark Kendall – Robert Greenberg – Darin Okuda – Jason Heikenfeld – Bob Knight – Phillip Alvelda – Paul Nuyujukian –  Peter Fischer – Tony Chahine – Shahin Farshchi – Ambar Bhattacharyya – Adam D’Augelli

Registration rates increase November 24th, 2017

 

Video: Boston VC’s on funding digital health innovation

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Video:  Flare Capital’s Bill Geary, Bessemer’s Steve Kraus, Oak HC/FT’s Nancy Brown, and Optum Ventures’ Michael Weintraub on funding and commercializing innovation.

Recorded at ApplySci’s Digital Health + Neurotech conference at the MIT Media Lab, September 19, 2017


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech Silicon Valley on February 26-27, 2018 at Stanford University, featuring:  Vinod KhoslaJustin SanchezBrian OtisBryan JohnsonZhenan BaoNathan IntratorCarla PughJamshid Ghajar – Mark Kendall

Small, adhesive, wireless patch collects, transmits, extensive health data

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Northwestern’s John Rogers and Kyung-In Jang of the Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology have developed a small, adhesive, flexible silicone patch capable of monitoring multiple health parameters.

The soft, body-conforming wearable contains 50 components connected by  250  3-D wire coils embedded in protective silicone.  It collects and wirelessly transmits data about movement, respiration, and  electrical activity in the heart, muscles, eyes and brain.

Jang believes that the biosensors could be devloped into a closed loop medical system using big data and AI, and thereby facilitate quality remote healthcare. The team is also exploring the use of the patch in robotics and self-driving cars.

Professor Rogers will present his research at ApplySci’s upcoming Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech conference, on September 19th at the MIT Media Lab.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Boston on September 19, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab – featuring  Joi Ito – Ed Boyden – Roz Picard – George Church – Nathan Intrator –  Tom Insel – John Rogers – Jamshid Ghajar – Phillip Alvelda – Michael Weintraub – Nancy Brown – Steve Kraus – Bill Geary – Mary Lou Jepsen

Registration rates increase Friday, August 25th.


ANNOUNCING WEARABLE TECH + DIGITAL HEALTH + NEUROTECH SILICON VALLEY – FEBRUARY 26 -27, 2018 @ STANFORD UNIVERSITY –  FEATURING:  ZHENAN BAO – JUSTIN SANCHEZ – BRYAN JOHNSON – NATHAN INTRATOR – VINOD KHOSLA

Hypoallergenic, continuous, week-long health wearable

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University of Tokyo professor Takao Someya has developed a hypoallergenic, adhesive, continuous health sensor. The device can be worn comfortably for a week because of its nanoscal mesh elastic electrodes.  This allows the skin to breathe, preventing inflammation.

The electrodes contains a  biologically compatible,  water-soluble polymer, polyvinyl alcohol, and a gold layer. The wearable  is applied by spraying a tiny amount of water, which dissolves the PVA nanofibers, and allows it to stick easily to the skin. It conforms to curvilinear surfaces of human skin, such as sweat pores and the ridges of an index finger’s fingerprint pattern.

A study of 20 subjects wearing the device showed that  electrical activity of muscles were comparable to those obtained through conventional gel electrodes.  There was no inflammation after one week, and repeated bending and stretching did not cause damage, making this a potentially disruptive method to monitor health and performance.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Boston on September 19, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab – featuring  Joi Ito – Ed Boyden – Roz Picard – George Church – Nathan Intrator –  Tom Insel – John Rogers – Jamshid Ghajar – Phillip Alvelda – Michael Weintraub – Nancy Brown – Steve Kraus – Bill Geary – Mary Lou Jepsen – Daniela Rus

Registration rates increase Friday, July 21st

Adhesive patch + nose wearable detect sleep apnea

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Somnarus has developed a disposable, adhesive patch that detects obstructive sleep apnea at home.

The SomnaPatch is worn on the forehead, wth an addtional piece on the nose. It records nasal pressure, blood oxygen saturation, pulse rate, respiratory effort, body position and how long a patient is asleep.

An 174-patient study showed that results from the SomnaPatch matched standard in-lab polysomnography 87% of the time.

If the device is proven effective in larger studies, it could be a cheaper, more comfortable alternative to lab-based sleep studies.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Boston on September 19, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab – featuring  Joi Ito – Ed Boyden – Roz Picard – George Church – Nathan Intrator –  Tom Insel – John Rogers – Jamshid Ghajar – Phillip Alvelda – Michael Weintraub – Nancy Brown – Steve Kraus – Bill Geary – Mary Lou Jepsen

Preferred registration rates available through Friday, June 9th.

Earbud sensor reportedly measures blood pressure, dehydration

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As health sensors become more discreet, and fused with commonly worn devices, Kyocera has integrated a tiny, optical sensor into its earbud.  The hybrid music/phone/health use wearable measures blood flow in hypodermal tissues using Laser Doppler velocimetry. It can monitor nerve and blood pressure, levels of dehydration, and possible signs of heat stroke.  Sleep monitoring can be done more accurately than with current devices, and the effect of music on brain states can also be studied.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Boston on September 19, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab. Featuring Joi Ito – Ed Boyden – Roz Picard – George Church – Nathan Intrator –  Tom Insel – John Rogers – Jamshid Ghajar – Phillip Alvelda

REGISTER BY MAY 19TH AND SAVE $500