Category Archives: Virtual Reality

Anxiety reducing VR game

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Deep VR teaches breathing techniques meant to reduce the anxiety of users during a game. Its developers believe that the skills learned can also help manage stress during daily life.

It is the basis of a Radboud University study, in the lab of Isabela Granic, that aims to alleviate anxiety in children.  100 children have already been studied, the findings of which will guide the game’s future design and lead to the development of its sensor.

Exposure therapy will soon be added, to shift the experience from sedative to mildly frightening, in an attempt to systematically desensitize those with anxiety.

Click to view Deep VR video


Wearable Tech + Digital Health NYC – June 7, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

NeuroTech NYC – June 8, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

“Mixed Reality” headset could support surgery, rehab, learning

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Magic Leap has unveiled its “mixed reality” headset, where  virtual objects are integrated into the real world.  In addition to obvious gaming and entertainment applications, the system could be used in healthcare (including in surgery, surgery preparation, and orthopedic rehabilitation) and education.

The company remains vague in its description of its technology, but head and hand tracking functionality appear to have been added.   According to founder Rony Abramovitz, “Magic Leap doesn’t trick the brain. Rather it shoots photons into the eye that stimulate the cones and rods as if the hologram were real, or neurologically true.”

Click to view Magic Leap video.


Wearable Tech + Digital Health NYC – June 7, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

NeuroTech NYC – June 8, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

VR + sound to control pain

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In a recent study, York St. John University researchers have demonstrated the use of virtual reality headsets to control pain.  Discomfort was further reduced when sound was incorporated into the process.

In the experiment, a small group of adults submerged one hand in ice water while playing an Oculus VR  based game, with and with out sound.  While playing and hearing accompanying sounds, subjects could tolerate the discomfort for 79 seconds. With out sound, it was reduced to 56 seconds.  With out any VR support, they could tolerate the cold water for 30 seconds (on average).

If verified with a much larger group of subjects and a broader spectrum of pain/discomfort tested, this discovery could potentially bring a non-drug pain reducing method to individuals at home.


 

Wearable Tech + Digital Health San Francisco – April 5, 2016 @ the Mission Bay Conference Center

NeuroTech San Francisco – April 6, 2016 @ the Mission Bay Conference Center

Wearable Tech + Digital Health NYC – June 7, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

NeuroTech NYC – June 8, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

 

 

 

VR + sensors improve accuracy, speed of PTSD diagnosis

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PTSD is often misdiagnosed. Symptoms can be confused with those of depression.  Many clinicians lack the expertise needed to distinguish the condition, and therefore might not provide appropriate treatment.

To address this widespread dilemma, Draper has developed a diagnostic system that combines virtual reality data with psychophysiological sensors. The sensors monitor heart rate, sweat, and pupil diameter, while subjects experience different types of audio and visual stimuli.

Stimuli customized to a patient’s personal traumatic experience can generate robust psychophysiological responses. However,  the time needed to tailor stimuli  is often not available in a point-of-care setting.  Draper’s solution uses generalized stimuli that results in quicker, more accurate assessments.

Additional research will address larger samples over a wide geographic area, as well as patients suffering from multiple mental health issue and  chronic diseases.

According to Dr. Philip Parks, who oversees Draper’s neurotechnology portfolio: “Once diagnosed with a particular disorder, such as depression, most mental health patients get relatively the same treatment even though their symptoms and response to treatment choices may be quite different. We hope that one day these technologies will help clinicians ensure that patients get the best possible medication and other treatments at the right time.”

Dr. Parks will be a featured speaker at NeuroTech NYC on June 8th at the New York Academy of Sciences.


Wearable Tech + Digital Health San Francisco – April 5, 2016 @ the Mission Bay Conference Center

NeuroTech San Francisco – April 6 @ the Mission Bay Conference Center

Wearable Tech + Digital Health NYC – June 7, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

NeuroTech NYC – June 8, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

Virtual clinic uses apps, VR, data, wearables in remote care

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USC’s Center for Body Computing, led by Professor Leslie Saxon, has created the Virtual Care Clinic, featuring vetted, best of class partners providing integrated remote healthcare solutions.  The eight initial partners are Doctor Evidence, IMS Health, Karten Design, Medable, Planet Grande, Proteus Digital Health and VSP Global.

Mobile apps, virtual doctors, data collection and analysis systems,  and diagnostic and monitoring wearables  will provide on-demand access to care.


Wearable Tech + Digital Health San Francisco – April 5, 2016 @ the Mission Bay Conference Center

NeuroTech San Francisco – April 6, 2016 @ the Mission Bay Conference Center

Wearable Tech + Digital Health NYC – June 7, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

NeuroTech NYC – June 8, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

 

AR + Kinect games assist the hearing, visually impaired

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Reflex Arc‘s  augmented reality games  work with  Microsoft Kinect to help children learn sign language and assist the visually impaired with exercise.   Boris gestures sign language, and  The Nepalese Necklace helps those with no limited sight  with mobility training.

The games encourage exercise and  are designed to help blind children learn about  spatial awareness, balance, coordination, and orientation.

WEARABLE TECH + DIGITAL HEALTH SAN FRANCISCO – APRIL 5, 2016 @ THE MISSION BAY CONFERENCE CENTER

NEUROTECH SAN FRANCISCO – APRIL 6, 2016 @ THE MISSION BAY CONFERENCE CENTER

PREFERRED REGISTRATION RATES AVAILABLE THROUGH 11/30/15.

Personalized medicine via “medical avatars”

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The European Commission’s DISCIPULUS project, led by UCL researcher Vanessa Diaz,  aims to build a roadmap towards the “digital patient”.  The  dynamic, virtual version of an individual, which Diaz describes as a “medical avatar” could run simulations of treatments to find the best course of action.

If a symptomatic patient arrives at hospital, a  virtual “twin” is created, based on scans. Multiple testing is done on the avatar,  and new scans are continuously uploaded, to determine the outcomes of various treatments.

The best and most tailored plan is then carried out. The patient is discharged with wearables, or other sensor based devices, to monitor key metrics at home, and continue to update the virtual twin during recovery.

VR headset + bike sensors gamify fitness

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Virzoom is a virtual reality exercise system meant to decrease distractions, and increase focus and fun while riding a stationary bike.

Sensors attach to several parts of the bicycle. For example, one on the rear wheel measures speed, and one on the front wheel responds to direction.  After connecting via USB to a computer, VR software is dowloaded, and the experience begins.

VirZoom’s engineers are focused on increasing the number of gamified elements, to inspire users to cycle faster to earn credits and reach new levels. The company hopes  to boost motivation and interest by changing the VR experience each time.

Image credit:  BostInno

WEARABLE TECH + DIGITAL HEALTH NYC 2015 – JUNE 30 @ NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES.  REGISTER HERE.

Virtual Reality in neurosurgery planning

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UCLA Neurosurgery, led by Neil Martin,  is using VR in surgery planning, integrating the Oculus Rift with Surgical Theater’s 3D “SNAP” surgery navigation device.  (See ApplySci’s April, 2014 description of Surgical Theater’s technology.) The hope is to be able improve precision and outcomes, and decrease surgical time.

The VR scene is based on patient CT and MRI scans, allowing the surgeon to enter the virtual brain, examine the tumor or aneurysm, and plan surgical strategy and operative steps.  By preparing with this visual representation of the brain, surgeons might be better able to protect and preserve areas that control motor and language function during procedures.

WEARABLE TECH + DIGITAL HEALTH NYC 2015 – JUNE 30 @ NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES.  REGISTER HERE.