Tiny fiber optic sensor monitors blood flow in real-time

John Arkwright and Flinders University colleagues have developed a tiny, low cost, fiber-optic sensor to monitor blood flow through the aorta in real-time.  The goal is continuous monitoring during prolonged intensive care and surgical procedures.  Current blood flow measurement, using ultrasound or thermo-dilution,  is intermittent, averaging every 30 minutes.

The device is inserted through a small  aperture in the skin, into the femoral artery, when heart function is compromised.  Its size allows it to be  used in the tiny blood vessels of infants. Very young babies  are particularly susceptible to sudden drops in blood pressure and oxygen delivery to vital organs.


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