Search Results For: john rogers

Headset-free mixed reality

Disney Research’s Magic Bench is a mixed-reality technology that lets multiple users interact with animated characters, with out headsets or handheld devices.  When seated on the Magic Bench, one sees a mirrored image on a large display, creating a third-person point of view. The scene is reconstructed using a depth sensor, allowing participants to occupy […]

Alzheimer’s diagnosis disputed in up to 50% of PET study subjects

James Hendrix and Alzheimer’s Association colleagues are conducting a study to see how PET scans could change the nature of Alzheimer’s diagnosis and treatment. 4,000 of 18,000 subjects have been tested to date, with a stunning result showing that a significant portion of people with mild cognitive impairment or dementia who are taking medication for Alzheimer’s may […]

Hypoallergenic, continuous, week-long health wearable

University of Tokyo professor Takao Someya has developed a hypoallergenic, adhesive, continuous health sensor. The device can be worn comfortably for a week because of its nanoscal mesh elastic electrodes.  This allows the skin to breathe, preventing inflammation. The electrodes contains a  biologically compatible,  water-soluble polymer, polyvinyl alcohol, and a gold layer. The wearable  is applied […]

Direct brain path for sight, sound via implanted microscope

Rice University’s Jacob Robinson, with Yale and Columbia colleagues, are developing FlatScope — a flat, brain implanted microscope that monitors and triggers neurons which are modified to be fluorescent when active. While capturing greater detail than current brain probes, the microscope also goes through deep levels that illustrate  sensory input processing — which they hope to […]

AI driven, music-triggered brain state therapy for pain, sleep, stress, gait

The Sync Project has developed a novel, music-based, non-pharmaceutical approach to treating pain, sleep, stress, and Parkinson’s gait issues. Recent studies showed Parkinson’s patients improved their gait when listening to a song with the right beat pattern, and post surgery patients used 1/3 the amount of self-administered morphine after listening to an hour of music. […]