Category Archives: Sensors

BP cuff + accelerometer detect early preeclampsia

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Purdue’s Craig Goergen has developed a sensor-based supine pressor test to detect preeclampsia.

The technology measures and notes the difference between a pregnant woman’s diastolic blood pressure while in two different positions, using a BP wrist cuff and accelerometer on the stomach.

The two devices are connected to an app which guides the wearer, and ensures that the readings are taken in correct positions. Diastolic pressure differences are the definitive way to detect preecamplsia, which according to the researchers, can be seen and treated earlier with the simple system.

Click to view Purdue video


Join ApplySci at the 9th Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech Boston conference on September 24, 2019 at the MIT Media Lab.  Speakers include:  George ChurchRoz PicardNathan IntratorKeith JohnsonJuan EnriquezJohn MattisonRoozbeh GhaffariPoppy Crum

Gait sensor could detect Alzheimer’s, identify fall risk

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Newcastle University’s Lynn Rochester has studied the use of wearable sensors to identify walking characteristics as clinical biomarkers for Alzheimer’s Disease.  The same sensors can detect gait changes that require intervention to prevent falls and prolong independence.

According to Rochester, “free-living gait analysis at home is particularly useful as it allows objective observation of an individual’s day-to-day activity. It also has the benefit of providing continuous data over a prolonged time that may be more sensitive than one-off assessments.”

She believes that continuous walking sensors could make clinical trials more efficient, and support clinician decisions.


Join ApplySci at the 9th Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech Boston conference on September 24 2018 at the MIT Media Lab

Saliva-monitoring chip to track bone loss, diabetes, inflammatory markers

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Washington University’s Erica Lynn Scheller and Shantanu Chakrabartty are developing a gum or dental device-worn sensor to detect early signs of  disease by analyzing saliva or gingival crevicular fluid.

The sensor plus electronic chip is a few millimeters-cube in volume and measures disease-specific peptides.  A wireless ultrasound device reads the peptide levels and connects to the cloud.

The first use will be monitoring  bone breakdown during periodontitis. The goal is to track multiple inflammatory and stress markers and to monitor diabetes.

Click to view Washington University video


Join ApplySci at the 9th Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech Boston conference on September 24 2018 at the MIT Media Lab

Muscle-force measuring wearable

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University of Wisconsin’s Darryl Thelen and Jack Martin have developed a noninvasive approach to measuring tendon tension while a person is active.

Current wearables can measure movement, but not muscle force.

The technology provides insight into motor control and human movement mechanics, and can be applied in orthopedics, rehabilitation, ergonomics, and sports.

The device is mounted on skin over a tendon, lightly tapping it 50 times per second. Each tap initiates a wave in the tendon, and two miniature accelerometers determine how quickly it travels. This assesses  force via vibrational characteristics of the tendon change during loading.  Tensile stress is then measured.

It has been used to measure forces on the Achilles tendon, patellar and hamstring tendons. Changes were observed when  gait was modified, which can enable clinicians to optimize the treatment of musculoskeletal disease and injuries. It may also be useful to determine when a repaired tendon is  healed.


Join ApplySci at the 9th Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech Boston conference on September 24, 2018 at the MIT Media Lab

DARPA’s Justin Sanchez on driving and reshaping biotechnology | ApplySci @ Stanford

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DARPA Biological Technologies Office Director Dr. Justin Sanchez on driving and reshaping biotechnology.  Recorded at ApplySci’s Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech Silicon Valley conference on February 26-27, 2018 at Stanford University.


Join ApplySci at the 9th Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech Boston conference on September 25, 2018 at the MIT Media Lab

Throat-worn sensor-sticker transforms stroke rehab

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John Rogers‘ latest stretchable electronics breakthrough will transform stroke rehabilitation.

The throat-worn wearable, developed with the  Shirley Ryan AbilityLab, measures patients’ swallowing ability and patterns of speech, and aids in aphasia diagnosis.

The Shirley Ryan AbilityLab uses the throat sensor in conjunction with Rogers-developed biosensors on the legs, arms and chest to monitor stroke patients’ recovery progress. Data is sent to clinicians’ phones and computers, providing real-time, quantitative, full-body analysis of patients’ advanced physical and physiological responses.

Click to view Shirley Ryan Ability Lab video

Click to view John Rogers’ talk at ApplySci’s Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech conference, on September 19, 2017 at the MIT Media Lab


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech Silicon Valley on February 26-27, 2018 at Stanford University. Speakers include:  Vinod Khosla – Justin Sanchez – Brian Otis – Bryan Johnson – Zhenan Bao – Nathan Intrator – Carla Pugh – Jamshid Ghajar – Mark Kendall – Robert Greenberg – Darin Okuda – Jason Heikenfeld – Bob Knight – Phillip Alvelda – Paul Nuyujukian –  Peter Fischer – Tony Chahine – Shahin Farshchi – Ambar Bhattacharyya – Adam D’Augelli – Juan-Pablo Mas – Shreyas Shah– Walter Greenleaf – Jacobo Penide  – Peter Fischer – Ed Boyden

**LAST TICKETS AVAILABLE

Tissue-paper sensor tracks pulse, finger and eye movement, gait

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University of Washington’s Jae-Hyun Chung has developed a  disposable wearable sensor made with tissue paper. It can detect a heartbeat, finger force, finger movement, eyeball movement, gait patterns, and other actions.

Tearing the nanocomposite paper breaks its fibers and makes it act as a sensor. It is light, flexible and cheap, and meant to be thrown away after one use.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech Silicon Valley on February 26-27, 2018 at Stanford University. Speakers include:  Vinod Khosla – Justin Sanchez – Brian Otis – Bryan Johnson – Zhenan Bao – Nathan Intrator – Carla Pugh – Jamshid Ghajar – Mark Kendall – Robert Greenberg – Darin Okuda – Jason Heikenfeld – Bob Knight – Phillip Alvelda – Paul Nuyujukian –  Peter Fischer – Tony Chahine – Shahin Farshchi – Ambar Bhattacharyya – Adam D’Augelli – Juan-Pablo Mas – Shreyas Shah– Walter Greenleaf – Jacobo Penide  – Peter Fischer – Ed Boyden

**LAST TICKETS AVAILABLE

Inflammation-free e-skin sensor monitors health for one week

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Takao Someya at the University of Tokyo has developed a hypoallergenic, inflammation free, wearable e-skin health sensor that can be worn comfortably for a week.  Somaya believes that this technology is the basis for truly long term, continuous health monitoring.

The electrode is based on nanoscale meshes containing a water-soluble polymer, polyvinyl alcohol and gold. A small amount of water  is required to dissolve the PVA and attach the sensor to the skin.

Mechanical durability was tested by repeated bending and stretching (more than10,000 times) of a conductor attached to the forefinger of 20 people.

EMG recordings with the new sensor were as accurate as those using conventional electrodes.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech Silicon Valley on February 26-27, 2018 at Stanford University. Speakers include:  Vinod Khosla – Justin Sanchez – Brian Otis – Bryan Johnson – Zhenan Bao – Nathan Intrator – Carla Pugh – Jamshid Ghajar – Mark Kendall – Robert Greenberg – Darin Okuda – Jason Heikenfeld – Bob Knight – Phillip Alvelda – Paul Nuyujukian –  Peter Fischer – Tony Chahine – Shahin Farshchi – Ambar Bhattacharyya – Adam D’Augelli – Juan-Pablo Mas – Shreyas Shah– Walter Greenleaf – Jacobo Penide – David Sarno – Peter Fischer

Registration rates increase on February 9th

Biodegradable piezoelectric sensor monitors lungs, brain

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UConn’s Thanh Duc Nguyen has developed a biodegradable pressure sensor to monitor chronic lung disease, swelling of the brain, and other health issues.

It is small and flexible and designed to replace existing, potentially toxic, implantable pressure sensors. Those sensors must be removed, subjecting patients to another invasive procedure, prolonging recovery, and increasing infection risk.

The piezoelectric device can also be used for electrical stimulation of tissue, as it emits a small electrical charge when pressure is applied. Other potential applications include monitoring glaucoma, heart disease, and bladder cancer.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech Silicon Valley on February 26-27, 2018 at Stanford University. Speakers include:  Vinod Khosla – Justin Sanchez – Brian Otis – Bryan Johnson – Zhenan Bao – Nathan Intrator – Carla Pugh – Jamshid Ghajar – Mark Kendall – Robert Greenberg – Darin Okuda – Jason Heikenfeld – Bob Knight – Phillip Alvelda – Paul Nuyujukian –  Peter Fischer – Tony Chahine – Shahin Farshchi – Ambar Bhattacharyya – Adam D’Augelli – Juan-Pablo Mas – Michael Eggleston – Walter Greenleaf – Jacobo Penide – David Sarno – Peter Fischer

Registration rates increase – January 19th

Ingestible sensor monitors gut oxygen, hydrogen, carbon dioxide

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Peter Gibson, Kyle Berean and  RMIT colleagues have developed an ingestible sensor that measures oxygen, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide in the gut.

In a recent study, subjects were monitored while modulating gut microbial fermentative activities by altering their intake of dietary fiber. Ultrasound imaging confirmed that the oxygen-equivalent concentration profile could be used as an accurate marker for the location of the capsule. Variations of fiber intake were found to be associated with differing small intestinal and colonic transit times, and gut fermentation. Regional fermentation patterns could be defined via hydrogen gas profiles.

The capsule could be used as a tool for monitoring the impact of one’s diet, and as a gut disorder diagnostic tool.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech Silicon Valley on February 26-27, 2018 at Stanford University. Speakers include:  Vinod Khosla – Justin Sanchez – Brian Otis – Bryan Johnson – Zhenan Bao – Nathan Intrator – Carla Pugh – Jamshid Ghajar – Mark Kendall – Robert Greenberg – Darin Okuda – Jason Heikenfeld – Bob Knight – Phillip Alvelda – Paul Nuyujukian –  Peter Fischer – Tony Chahine – Shahin Farshchi – Ambar Bhattacharyya – Adam D’Augelli – Juan-Pablo Mas – Michael Eggleston – Walter Greenleaf – Jacobo Penide – David Sarno – Peter Fischer

Registration rates increase – January 19th.