Google’s conductive fabric for everyday wear

Google’s Project Jacquard creates conductive fabrics that can be woven into every day clothes.  The yarn is tough enough for industrial weaving, and can connect to chips that react to gestures, and monitor heart rate or body temperature. This seamless integration of sensors into clothing can make health monitoring ubiquitous. In a demo at the company’s I/O conference, …

Sensor could continuously monitor brain aneurysm treatment

Georgia Tech’s Woon-Hong Yeo has  developed a proof of concept, flexible, stretchable sensor that can continuously monitor hemodynamics when integrated with a stent like flow diverter after a brain aneurysm. Blood flow is measured using  capacitance changes. According to Pittsburgh professor Youngjae Chun, who collaborated with Yeo, “We have developed a highly stretchable, hyper-elastic flow diverter using a …

3D, real-scale blood brain barrier model used to study new therapeutics

Gianni Ciofani  of ITT Pisa has created a device that reproduces a 1:1 scale model of the blood-brain barrier.  The combination of 3D printed artificial and biological components will allow the study of new therapeutic strategies to overcome the blood-brain barrier and treat brain diseases, including tumors, Alzheimers, and multiple sclerosis. A laser that scans …

Sensor sock detects diabetic inflammation, sends alerts

Siren Care‘s real-time temperature sensing smart sock is meant to detect foot inflammation in diabetics.  The goal is early notification to prevent (difficult to heal) sores and other symptoms of the disease, which can lead to extreme complications. Data is stored in the fabric  and in the cloud.  An app sends alerts when a temperature event …

3D printed renal architecture

Harvard’s Jennifer Lewis and Roche’s  Annie Moisan have used 3D printing to fabricate a small but critical subunit of a kidney.  The renal architecture contains living epithelial cells. Earlier bioprinting approaches were adapted to form thick tissues.  A 3D-printed silicone gasket was used to cast an engineered extracellular matrix as a base layer. “Fugitive ink” was …

“Cognitive Dress” colors reflect observer emotions

At the Met Gala, New York’s most sought-after invitation, Karolina Kurkova wore a Marchesa dress that was powered by IBM Watson to react to social media sentiment in real-time. The “Cognitive Dress” was covered in LED embedded fabric flowers that lit in colors to reflect joy, passion, excitement, encouragement and curiosity, as expressed on twitter. …

Smart airline uniforms improve passenger safety

easyJet has partnered with CuteCircuit to create sensor embedded crew uniforms to improve passenger safety. Cabin crew uniforms have shoulder LEDs and illuminated hems to provide lighting. Lapel LEDs display fight numbers, and microphones  in the fabric enable immediate communication. Engineers’ uniforms have LEDs in  jacket hoods to illuminate work areas, and built in cameras …

Military shockwave sensor used for sports concussion detection

Early detection of concussion can enable more rapid treatment and better outcomes. The Linx IAS  sensor detects head impact severity during sports training.  It was built upon military technology that measures the  impact of  explosion shockwaves on the brain. The sensor is part of fabric headband.  Concussive forces are transmitted to an app that rates each blow …

Sensor shorts provide real time runner feedback

ApplySci has described several examples of smart shirts and smart fabrics in recent months.  Now, Lumo his integrated sensors into shorts to monitor  cadence, stride length, pace, distance and pelvic rotation in runners.  Placed inside the waistband, the sensors sync with smartphones to provide real time feedback, and the app sends data and coaching content …

Temperature adaptive clothing cools and heats accordingly

UC San Diego professor Joseph Wang continues to revolutionize health focused wearable technology.  ApplySci recently described his totally noninvasive glucose monitoring tattoo, and his bio-ink pen for self monitoring. Professor Wang is now developing clothes with integrated sensors that enable them to heat or cool wearers.  He believes this can  reduce energy costs by regulating …