Robot assesses, assists dementia patients

Ludwig is a University of Toronto – built robot meant to assist seniors with cognitive issues.

“He” stands in front of a person, displays a picture on a screen, and asks the viewer to describe what he or she sees. Ludwig then interprets a user’s condition, including engagement, happiness or anxiety, and behavior changes over time.

With in-ear microphones, in-eye cameras, and feet embedded sensors, he tracks one’s stare, body movement, intonation and choice of words.  Based on these factors, speech recognition technology provides an analysis of cognitive health.

The second generation robot was originally built to guide seniors around their own homes, but was not interactive.

The new system will be piloted in a senior living facility in Canada next month.  Ludwig will be placed  in a common room so that residents can approach him casually.  If successful, a robot like this could help seniors age in place, or assist those with brain injuries and diseases in managing the activities of daily living.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + NeuroTech Silicon Valley – February 7-8, 2017 @Stanford University

Wearable detects cardiac arrest, notifies emergency services

 iBeat is a wearable emergency response system that continuously monitors the heart.  Meant for seniors, it detects cardiac arrest in real time, provides alerts, and sends regular updates to caregivers.

If cardiac arrest is detected, the wearer receives a call within 10 seconds.  If he/she cannot be reached, an emergency contact and emergency medical services are called.

A user can also activate the device manually in an emergency, such as a fall, car accident, or home invasion.


Wearable Tech + Digital Health NYC – June 7, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

NeuroTech NYC – June 8, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

Voice, image,language identifying robot responds to human dialogue

Hitachi’s EMIEW3 robot, designed to provide customer service in commercial environments, could be an ideal companion for the elderly or disabled. Its “remote brain” allows it to identify voices, images and language in its surroundings (which it can process with background street noise).  AI enables it to  respond to human dialogue and avoid collisions.  It is light enough to lift,can move at 6km per hour,  and stand on its own if knocked over. A cosmetic LED-light “beating heart” makes the robot seem more human.


Wearable Tech + Digital Health NYC – June 7, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

NeuroTech NYC – June 8, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

Pressure change sensor detects more fall types in seniors

SINTEF‘s Anders Liverud and Tellu AS colleagues have developed a fall detector able to detect more types of incidents, including “sinking falls” often missed by current sensors.

These slow motion falls are difficult to monitor as they occur slowly, and the g-forces are not significant.  Examples include when a senior slides down a wall, or off the side of a bed.

The new system compares pressure changes between a sensor attached to a user’s upper body and others installed around the house. When the pressure in the sensor attached to the body rises, the system shows that the user is falling, irrespective of how rapidly or slowly it happens.  Altitude changes of as little as one centimeter are registered.

The technology has previously been used to measure changes in aircraft altitude, but never before as a fall detector.


Wearable Tech + Digital Health San Francisco – April 5, 2016 @ the Mission Bay Conference Center

NeuroTech San Francisco – April 6, 2016 @ the Mission Bay Conference Center

Wearable Tech + Digital Health NYC – June 7, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

NeuroTech NYC – Jun 8, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

 

“X ray” vision for fall prevention, motion detection

Dina Katabi and MIT colleagues are using radio signal based software to recognize human silhouettes through walls, and track movements.  The technology is intended to help monitor children and the elderly, and could be used by the military and the police.

The signal is displayed on a screen, where movements are tracked in real time. The person is shown as a red dot, and can be seen moving around a room, sitting in a chair, or moving faster or slower.  Breathing and heart rate can be monitored (with out the use of a wearable), and people can be identified based on their skeleton.  In the event of a fall, caregivers are notified by text or email.


Wearable Tech + Digital Health San Francisco – April 5, 2016 @ the Mission Bay Conference Center

NeuroTech San Francisco – April 6, 2016 @ the Mission Bay Conference Center

Wearable Tech + Digital Health NYC – June 7, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

NeuroTech NYC – June 8, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

 

Senior caregiver matching + crowdfunding

HomeHero is a senior caregiver site that uses an algorithm to match families with carers, and provides video interviews, daily, mobile access to care reports and security camera feeds.

While it is not the only caregiver matching site, it is perhaps the slickest, and has one standout feature — the ability to crowdfund care via HeroFund.

The cost of senior care in the United States is exorbitant, and often prohibitive.  ApplySci applauds HomeHero for recognizing this, and for giving average seniors a chance to receive proper care.


Wearable Tech + Digital Health San Francisco – April 5, 2016 @ the Mission Bay Conference Center

NeuroTech San Francisco – April 6, 2016 @ the Mission Bay Conference Center

Wearable Tech + Digital Health NYC – June 7, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

NeuroTech NYC – June 8, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

 

Interactive senior health and brain training app

Notre Dame’s Nitesh Chawla has created eSeniorCare, a personalized, social app to help seniors age in place.

Several existing apps  track data.  eSeniorCare is meant to engage and stimulate seniors, and be interactive.  Users can connect with carers by sending questions and concerns through text or voice recordings.

Health goals are tracked and sent to supporters who can provide guidance and motivation.  Video, audio and text medication reminders can be sent.  Stimulating brain games, designed to enhance cognition and prevent degeneration, can be played.

The goal is senior independence, combined with a support system with enough data to proactively reach out when needed.

WEARABLE TECH + DIGITAL HEALTH SAN FRANCISCO – APRIL 5, 2016 @ THE MISSION BAY CONFERENCE CENER

NEUROTECH SAN FRANCISCO – APRIL 6, 2016 @ THE MISSION BAY CONFERENCE CENTER

Gait monitoring wearable to prevent senior falls

Roozbeh Jafari and Texas A&M colleagues are developing a gait monitoring wearable to  prevent senior falls.  The system will analyze multiple sway and gait parameters while one walks or stands on one leg.   Users will receive auditory and vibration feedback to reduce an unsafe sway and prevent falls. The wearable will be worn on the ankle and chest, and can be used for home monitoring or clinical training/risk assessment.

WEARABLE TECH + DIGITAL HEALTH SAN FRANCISCO – APRL 5, 2016 @ THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES

NEUROTECH SAN FRANCISCO – APRIL 6, 2016 @ THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES

Device analyzes senior behavior, notifies caregivers of anomalies

Numera EverThere monitors senior health and daily activities in real time, and immediately notifies caregivers of of out-of-parameter readings.

Senior safety products are typically reactive — the most popular example being a button pushed after a wearer has fallen.  EverThere aims to be proactive, monitoring  daily activities and movement to determine anomalies which require intervention.

The service and open cloud platform  work with the Numera Libris, a 3G connected, GPS-enabled two-way voice communication device, which sends customized notifications to caregivers.

WEARABLE TECH + DIGITAL HEALTH SAN FRANCISCO – APRIL 5, 2016 @ THE MISSION BAY CONFERENCE CENTER

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Senior robots perform tasks, respond to emergencies

Robots can help seniors age in place.  Following are examples of robots that perform tasks, communicate, and notify loved ones in emergencies.

Toyota’s Human Support Robot program’s current robot prototype is compact and highly maneuverable, with a folding arm which can pick up objects off the floor, and bring things down from shelves, among other tasks.   It will be able to be operated remotely by caregivers, with the operator’s face and voice being relayed in real time.

RIKEN and Sumitomo Riko’s  nursing care robot, called Robear, can lift a person from a bed into a wheelchair, or help him/her start up. It is designed to exert force gently, including actuator units with a low gear ratio that allow for softer movement of robotic joints, and tactile, rubber sensors to lift patients.

The GiraffPlus robot works with smart home technologies  Environmental sensors provide movement data, alerting carers of falls, and physiological sensors track health metrics,  such as blood pressure.

Fraunhofer’s Care-O-bot can perform a number of fetch-and-carry tasks; entertain and communicate – reminding an elderly person of important appointments, or when to take their medication – and respond to an emergency. It is able to move towards a fallen person, while communicating  with an emergency center, which can talk to the user by video,  using the robot’s screen, speakers and microphone.

The Bristol Robotics Laboratory has developed a  a “living lab” with smart home functionality. Robotics researchers, seniors with assistive needs and those supporting them to work together to create and test home robotic solutions. The Anchor Robotics Personalized Assisted Living  facility is connected via a network of wireless sensors and Wi-fi cameras to a central controller. Data generated from the sensors will enable the researchers to detect patterns of activity in the house to build adaptable algorithms. The algorithms will then be used to record individual habits and devise personalized robotic systems adapted to individual lifestyles.

WEARABLE TECH + DIGITAL HEALTH SAN FRANCISCO – APRIL 5, 2016  @ THE MISSION BAY CONFERENCE CENTER

NEUROTECH SAN FRANCISCO – APRIL 6, 2016 @ THE MISSION BAY CONFERENCE CENTER

REGISTER HERE.  PREFERRED RATE ENDS NOVEMBER 30TH.