Joi Ito on health: an antidisciplinary system of systems | ApplySci @ MIT

Joi Ito discussed health as an antidisciplinary system of systems at ApplySci’s last Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech conference at MIT:


Join ApplySci at the 9th Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech Boston conference on September 24, 2018 at the MIT Media Lab.  Speakers include:  Rudy Tanzi – Mary Lou Jepsen – George ChurchRoz PicardNathan IntratorKeith JohnsonJuan EnriquezJohn MattisonRoozbeh GhaffariPoppy Crum – Phillip Alvelda Marom Bikson

Just announced:  Ed Simcox, CTO of the US Department of Health and Human Services, will be the closing speaker at ApplySci’s Digital Health + Neurotech Boston conference on September 24, 2018

REGISTRATION RATES INCREASE JULY 20th

Gait sensor predicts senior falls

University of Illinois professors Bruce Schatz and David Buchner have developed a system to predict senior fall risk using motion sensors that measure walking patterns.

67 women over 60 were tested on walking ability,  detailed past annual falls, and wore an accelerometer for one week.

The analysis of device data and reported history enabled the researchers to accurately predict falls based on unsteadiness in standing and walking.

The goal is prevention — encouraging  those who know that they are at risk, and their physicians, to focus on strength and balance exercises.


Join ApplySci at the 9th Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech Boston conference on September 24, 2018 at the MIT Media Lab.  Speakers include:  Rudy Tanzi – Mary Lou Jepsen – George ChurchRoz PicardNathan IntratorKeith JohnsonJuan EnriquezJohn MattisonRoozbeh GhaffariPoppy Crum – Phillip Alvelda Marom Bikson

REGISTRATION RATES INCREASE JULY 20th

Sensor assesses blood clotting in 30 minutes

ClotChip assesses  blood clotting 95 times faster than current methods, with a single single drop of blood, using miniaturized dielectric spectroscopy.

A finger-prick sample is taken from heart arrhythmia, pulmonary embolism, post surgery, or  hemophilia patients, to analyze clotting abilities in the ER or at home.  Results are received in 30 minutes.

Caregivers currently cannot quickly assess if a patient with coagulation issues is at risk for spontaneous bleeding, or if the drugs they are taking are effective.

The company is completing clinical trials for use in hemophilia and anticoagulation therapy.


Join ApplySci at the 9th Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech Boston conference on September 24, 2018 at the MIT Media Lab.  Speakers include:  Rudy Tanzi – Mary Lou Jepsen – George ChurchRoz PicardNathan IntratorKeith JohnsonJuan EnriquezJohn MattisonRoozbeh GhaffariPoppy Crum – Phillip Alvelda Marom Bikson

REGISTRATION RATES INCREASE JULY 20th

AI predicts drug combination complications

Stanford’s Monica Agrawal, Jure Leskovec and Marinka Zitnik used AI to study the body’s underlying cellular machinery and predict side effects of drug combinations. There are about 1,000 known side effects and 5,000 drugs on the market, making nearly 125 billion possible side effects between all possible pairs of drugs.

The team created a network describing how the 19,000 proteins in our bodies interact with each other and how different drugs affect them. Using more than 4 million known associations between drugs and side effects, they  designed a method to identify patterns in how side effects arise based on how drugs target different proteins.


Join ApplySci at the 9th Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech Boston conference on September 24, 2018 at the MIT Media Lab.  Speakers include:  Rudy Tanzi – Mary Lou Jepsen – George ChurchRoz PicardNathan IntratorKeith JohnsonJuan EnriquezJohn MattisonRoozbeh GhaffariPoppy Crum – Phillip Alvelda Marom Bikson

REGISTRATION RATES INCREASE JULY 20th

Vinod Khosla on AI in healthcare | ApplySci @ Stanford

Vinod Khosla discussed AI at ApplySci’s recent Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech conference at Stanford;


Join ApplySci at the 9th Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech Boston conference on September 24, 2018 at the MIT Media Lab.  Speakers include:  Rudy Tanzi – Mary Lou Jepsen – George ChurchRoz PicardNathan IntratorKeith JohnsonJuan EnriquezJohn MattisonRoozbeh GhaffariPoppy Crum – Phillip Alvelda Marom Bikson

REGISTRATION RATES INCREASE JULY 13th

VR-enhanced molecular simulations

University of Bristol researchers, Oracle and Interactive Scientific  have used Oracle’s cloud infrastructure to combine real-time molecular simulations with VR, enabling them to “touch” molecules as they move — highlighting the potential of VR in seeing and manipulating complex 3D structures.  The technology could change how drugs are designed, and transform the teaching of chemical structures and dynamics.

The molecules can be virtually folded, knotted, plucked, and their shape changed to test how they interact.  The cloud allows several people to interact with them  in the same virtual space at the same time.

The team designed a series of molecular tasks to test on a mouse and keyboard, touchscreens and VR. This included threading a small molecule through a nanotube, changing the screw-sense of a small organic helix and tying a small string-like protein into a simple knot.  They said that in complex 3D tasks, VR gave participants up to 10 times more success.

Acocording to Bristol Professor Adrian Mulholland: “Chemists have always made models of molecules to understand their structure – from how atoms are bonded together to Watson and Crick’s famous double helix model of DNA. At one point in their education, most people have held a molecular model, probably made from plastic or metal. Models like these are particularly important for things we can’t see, such as the nanoscale world of molecules.  Thanks to this research we can now apply virtual reality to study a variety of molecular problems which are inherently dynamic, including binding drugs to its target, protein folding and chemical reactions. As simulations become faster we can now do this in real time which will change how drugs are designed and how chemical structures are taught.

Click to view University of Bristol video


Join ApplySci at the 9th Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech Boston conference on September 24, 2018 at the MIT Media Lab.  Speakers include:  Rudy Tanzi – Mary Lou Jepsen – George ChurchRoz PicardNathan IntratorKeith JohnsonJuan EnriquezJohn MattisonRoozbeh GhaffariPoppy Crum – Phillip Alvelda Marom Bikson

REGISTRATION RATES INCREASE JULY 13th

Eye implant measures pressure, releases fluid, in glaucoma

Caltech’s Azita Emami, Aubrey Shapero, Abhinav Agarwal and colleagues have developed a miniaturized, fully wireless, highly-sensitive, implantable, continuous pressure sensor that can remain in the human eye for four years.  The goal is early detection and treatment of glaucoma progression.

Current tonometer measurement, which requires anesthesia, only measures pressure during an appointment, and can miss many daily pressure fluctuations.

The device is implanted on the white of the eye and does not interfere with vision. It consists of a pressure sensor, control circuitry, and an antenna. With no battery, it small and long lasting. Radio waves from a handheld scanner are received by the antenna and generate a small voltage that temporarily powers the device, which then takes a pressure reading and sends the signal back to the reader, using the same antenna.

Encapsulation with liquid silicone and a polymer called parylene allowed the researchers to overcome the impact of fluid corrosion and tissue growth.  This is what enables the implant to remain in the eye much longer than previous devices.

A valve could also be added to release small amounts of fluid as tears, when pressure rises too high, creating a closed-loop glaucoma management system.


Join ApplySci at the 9th Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech Boston conference on September 24, 2018 at the MIT Media Lab.  Speakers include:  Rudy Tanzi – Mary Lou Jepsen – George ChurchRoz PicardNathan IntratorKeith JohnsonJuan EnriquezJohn MattisonRoozbeh GhaffariPoppy Crum – Phillip Alvelda Marom Bikson

REGISTRATION RATES INCREASE JULY 6th

David Axelrod: VR in healthcare & the Stanford Virtual Heart | ApplySci @ Stanford

David Axelrod discussed VR-based learning in healthcare, and the Stanford Virtual Heart, at ApplySci’s recent Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech conference at Stanford;


Join ApplySci at the 9th Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech Boston conference on September 24, 2018 at the MIT Media Lab.  Speakers include:  Rudy Tanzi – Mary Lou Jepsen – George ChurchRoz PicardNathan IntratorKeith JohnsonJuan EnriquezJohn MattisonRoozbeh GhaffariPoppy Crum – Phillip Alvelda Marom Bikson

REGISTRATION RATES INCREASE JULY 6th

Combined BCI + FES system could improve stroke recovery

Jose Millan and EPFL colleagues have combined a brain computer interface with functional electrical stimulation in a system that, in a study, showed the ability to enhance the restoration of limb use after a stroke.

According to Millan: “The key is to stimulate the nerves of the paralyzed arm precisely when the stroke-affected part of the brain activates to move the limb, even if the patient can’t actually carry out the movement. That helps re-establish the link between the two nerve pathways where the signal comes in and goes out.”

27 patients with a similar lesion that resulted in moderate to severe arm paralysis following a stroke participated in the trial. Half were treated with the dual-therapy approach, and reported clinically significant improvements.  A BCI system  enabled the researchers to pinpoint where the electrical activity occurred in the brain when they tried to extend their hands. Each time the electrical activity was identified, the system stimulated the muscle controlling the corresponding wrist and finger movements.

The control group received FES only, and had their arm muscles stimulated randomly. This allowed the scientists to understand how much additional motor function improvement could be attributed to the BCI system.


Join ApplySci at the 9th Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech Boston conference on September 24, 2018 at the MIT Media Lab.  Speakers include:  Rudy Tanzi – Mary Lou Jepsen – George ChurchRoz PicardNathan IntratorKeith JohnsonJuan EnriquezJohn MattisonRoozbeh GhaffariPoppy Crum – Phillip Alvelda Marom Bikson

REGISTRATION RATES INCREASE JUNE 29TH

Cheap, molecular-wired, metabolite-measuring sensor

Cambridge’s Anna-Maria Pappa, KAUST’s Sahika Inal, and colleagues have developed a low cost, molecular wired sensor that can measure metabolites in sweat, tears, saliva or blood.  It can be incorporated into flexible and stretchable substrates for cellular-level health monitoring.

A synthesised polymer acts as a molecular wire, accepting electrons produced during electrochemical reactions. It merges with sweat, tears or blood, absorbing ions and swelling, leading to high sensitivity.  The signal can be amplified when incorporated into complex circuits, responding to tiny fluctuations in metabolite concentration.

According to Pappa: “This is the first time that it’s been possible to use an electron accepting polymer that can be tailored to improve communication with the enzymes, which allows for the direct detection of a metabolite. It opens up new directions in biosensing, where materials can be designed to interact with a specific metabolite, resulting in far more sensitive and selective sensors.”


Join ApplySci at the 9th Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech Boston conference on September 24, 2018 at the MIT Media Lab.  Speakers include:  Rudy Tanzi – Mary Lou Jepsen – George ChurchRoz PicardNathan IntratorKeith JohnsonJuan EnriquezJohn MattisonRoozbeh GhaffariPoppy Crum – Phillip Alvelda Marom Bikson

REGISTRATION RATES INCREASE JUNE 29TH