Wireless system could track tumors, dispense medicine

Dina Katabi and MIT CSAIL colleagues have developed ReMix, which uses lo power wireless signals to pinponit the location of implants in the body.  The tiny implants could be used as tracking devices on shifting tumors to monitor  movements, and in the future to deliver drugs to specific regions.

The technology showed centimeter-level accuracy in animal tests.

Markers in the body reflect the signal transmitted by the wireless device outside the body, therefore a battery or external power source are not required.


Join ApplySci at the 9th Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech Boston conference on September 24, 2018 at the MIT Media Lab.  Speakers include:  Rudy Tanzi – Mary Lou Jepsen – George ChurchRoz PicardNathan IntratorKeith JohnsonJuan EnriquezJohn MattisonRoozbeh GhaffariPoppy Crum – Phillip Alvelda Marom Bikson – Ed Simcox – Sean Lane

AI – optimized glioblastoma chemotherapy

Pratik Shah, Gregory Yauney,  and MIT Media Lab researchers have developed an AI  model that could make glioblastoma chemotherapy regimens less toxic but still effective. It analyzes current regimens and iteratively adjusts doses to optimize treatment with the lowest possible potency and frequency toreduce tumor sizes.

In simulated trials of 50 patients, the machine-learning model designed treatment cycles that reduced the potency to a quarter or half of the doses It often skipped administration, which were then scheduled twice a year instead of monthly.

Reinforced learning was used to teach the model to favor certain behavior that lead to a desired outcome.  A combination of  temozolomide and procarbazine, lomustine, and vincristine, administered over weeks or months, were studied.

As the model explored the regimen, at each planned dosing interval it decided on actions. It either initiated or withheld a dose. If it administered, it then decided if the entire dose, or a portion, was necessary. It pinged another clinical model with each action to see if the the mean tumor diameter shrunk.

When full doses were given, the model was penalized, so it instead chose fewer, smaller doses. According to Shah, harmful actions were reduced to get to the desired outcome.

The J Crain Venter Institute’s Nicholas Schork said that the model offers a major improvement over the conventional “eye-balling” method of administering doses, observing how patients respond, and adjusting accordingly.


Join ApplySci at the 9th Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech Boston conference on September 24, 2018 at the MIT Media Lab.  Speakers include:  Rudy Tanzi – Mary Lou Jepsen – George ChurchRoz PicardNathan IntratorKeith JohnsonJuan EnriquezJohn MattisonRoozbeh GhaffariPoppy Crum – Phillip Alvelda Marom Bikson – Ed Simcox – Sean Lane

Hydrogen peroxide sensor to determine effective chemotherapy

MIT’s Hadley Sikes has developed a sensor that determines whether cancer cells respond to a particular type of chemotherapy by detecting hydrogen peroxide inside human cells.

The technology could help identify new cancer drugs that boost levels of hydrogen peroxide, which induces programmed cell death. The sensors could also be adapted to screen individual patients’ tumors to predict whether such drugs would be effective against them.


Join ApplySci at the 9th Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech Boston conference on September 24, 2018 at the MIT Media Lab.  Speakers include:  Rudy Tanzi – Mary Lou Jepsen – George ChurchRoz PicardNathan IntratorKeith JohnsonJuan EnriquezJohn MattisonRoozbeh GhaffariPoppy Crum – Phillip Alvelda Marom Bikson – Ed Simcox – Sean Lane