Non-invasive electric field treatment for glioblastoma

Optune by Novocure  uses targeted electric fields to disrupt cancer cell division and cause cancer cell death.  500 hospitals globally can prescribe the FDA approved treatment to glioblastoma patients.

“Tumor Treating Fields” are low intensity, alternating electric fields within the intermediate frequency range. TTFields disrupt cell division through physical interactions with key molecules during mitosis. The non-invasive treatment targets solid tumors.

Company founder Yoram Palti said that trials in other tumors will have results starting this year, and he “believes that we will change the way we treat cancer. There are other growths that are more sensitive to our approach than brain cancer. A pilot of 40 lung cancer patients had exciting results in a treatment where the electrodes are only worn 12 hours a day and not 24.”

Click to view Optune US video


Wearable Tech + Digital Health NYC – June 7, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

NeuroTech NYC – June 8, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

Anxiety reducing VR game

Deep VR teaches breathing techniques meant to reduce the anxiety of users during a game. Its developers believe that the skills learned can also help manage stress during daily life.

It is the basis of a Radboud University study, in the lab of Isabela Granic, that aims to alleviate anxiety in children.  100 children have already been studied, the findings of which will guide the game’s future design and lead to the development of its sensor.

Exposure therapy will soon be added, to shift the experience from sedative to mildly frightening, in an attempt to systematically desensitize those with anxiety.

Click to view Deep VR video


Wearable Tech + Digital Health NYC – June 7, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

NeuroTech NYC – June 8, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

Semantic brain atlas created with fMRI

Jack Gallant and Berkeley colleagues have used fMRI to understand how language-related information is represented and processed in the human brain.  Brain blood flow changes were measured once every second, as subjects listened to natural narrative stories. Mathematical models and big data analysis were used to create detailed maps, showing how different aspects of language are represented in different brain locations.

Gallant hopes that this research will be used in the future to help stroke patients recover language skills, design faster computers, and to create brain computer interfaces to allow communication without speech.

Click to view NSF video


NeuroTech NYC – June 8, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

Wearable Tech + Digital Health NYC – June 7, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

Sports camera collects, overlays health data

As part of its new developer program, GoPro has partnered with Polar to overlay health data on videos. Similar to video games, sports videos will be able to display heart rate, speed, distance, and altitude.  This has been presented as a fun feature, but could also provide physicians with a better understanding of one’s health in various scenarios.

Click to view Polar video


Wearable Tech + Digital Health NYC – June 7, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

NeuroTech NYC – June 8, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

Heart monitoring patch tracks patients post-discharge

BeVITAL by Vital Connect, in partnership with BePatient, is a clinical grade, continuous, heart monitoring wearable, and data sharing system, for the early detection of abnormalities post-discharge. The thin, disposable patch adheres to the chest, and tracks heart activity, breathing, temperature, movement, posture, and falls. It can be used for 4 days, and transmits data to a phone or hub before it is stored in the cloud.

The system has been tested on 100 patients in Europe, and will soon be trialed at the John Muir Medical Center.  The study will compare data quality and patient outcomes of BeVITAL wearers with inpatient care.

Click to view KTVU News video


Wearable Tech + Digital Health NYC – June 7, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

NeuroTech NYC – June 8, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

“Mixed Reality” headset could support surgery, rehab, learning

Magic Leap has unveiled its “mixed reality” headset, where  virtual objects are integrated into the real world.  In addition to obvious gaming and entertainment applications, the system could be used in healthcare (including in surgery, surgery preparation, and orthopedic rehabilitation) and education.

The company remains vague in its description of its technology, but head and hand tracking functionality appear to have been added.   According to founder Rony Abramovitz, “Magic Leap doesn’t trick the brain. Rather it shoots photons into the eye that stimulate the cones and rods as if the hologram were real, or neurologically true.”

Click to view Magic Leap video.


Wearable Tech + Digital Health NYC – June 7, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

NeuroTech NYC – June 8, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

EEG “password” uses stimulus response to confirm identity

Binghamton researchers have developed an EEG “brainprint” system that can identify people with 100 per cent accuracy, according to a recent study.

A brain-password is recorded when a user’s stimulus response activity is recorded via EEG. Identity is then confirmed by exposing the user to the same stimulus,  recording their response, and using a pattern classification system to compare the results.

ApplySci described the team’s initial “brain as password” work in 2015, and similar research done at UC Berkeley in 2013.


Wearable Tech + Digital Health NYC – June 7, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

NeuroTech NYC – June 8, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

Ultraflexible OLED “skin” can monitor pulse, blood oxygen

Takao Someya  has developed OLED-embedded electronic “skin” for health monitoring applications –particularly pulse monitoring and blood oxygen sensing — at the University of Tokyo. It is thin, and can move with the skin and body, eliminating the need for rigid glass or plastic substrates, and potentially replacing health monitoring devices.

Previous attempts at skin-display tech could only last a few hours, because oxygen and water vapor in the air penetrated the skin, damaging it.  A protective film allows the new “skin” to last for several days. Indium tin oxide electrodes are attached to a very thin substrate, powering ultrathin polymer light-emitting diodes  and organic photodetectors in the skin.


Wearable Tech + Digital Health NYC – June 7, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

NeuroTech NYC – June 8, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

Avatar and robot based games to treat social anxiety

AlterEgo is  an interdisciplinary collaboration that is investigating  a “new robotic-based clinical method” to help people suffering from social anxiety.  The scientists believe that lookalike avatars and robots can be a more comfortable interaction for patients, facilitating a more effective therapeutic experience.

According to project lead Krasimira Tsaneve-Atanasova: “This resemblance can be morphological (form of a person), behavioral (his actions), or kinematic (the way he moves).”

Click to view AlterEgo video.


Wearable Tech + Digital Health NYC – June 7, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

NeuroTech NYC – June 8, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciencces

PREFERRED REGISTRATION RATES AVAILABLE THROUGH 4/15

Implanted chip enables quadriplegic to move arm with thoughts

Battelle’s NeuroLife system has allowed a quadriplegic man to to make complex movements with his hand and fingers, using signals from his brain.

The breakthrough invasive device uses an artificial neural bypass that reroutes signals from the brain to the affected muscles. A tiny, 96 channel microelectrode array was implanted in the patient’s motor cortex. A cable port was positioned at the back of his head. The device taps into a few hundred motor neurons, providing enough information for the execution of basic physical tasks. A computer was then trained to understand the signals emitted by the motor cortex, resulting in the patient’s ability to move his hand with his thoughts.

Click to view Ohio State University video


 

Wearable Tech + Digital Health NYC – June 7, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences

NeuroTech NYC – June 8, 2016 @ the New York Academy of Sciences