Ingestible sensor monitors gut oxygen, hydrogen, carbon dioxide

Peter Gibson, Kyle Berean and  RMIT colleagues have developed an ingestible sensor that measures oxygen, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide in the gut.

In a recent study, subjects were monitored while modulating gut microbial fermentative activities by altering their intake of dietary fiber. Ultrasound imaging confirmed that the oxygen-equivalent concentration profile could be used as an accurate marker for the location of the capsule. Variations of fiber intake were found to be associated with differing small intestinal and colonic transit times, and gut fermentation. Regional fermentation patterns could be defined via hydrogen gas profiles.

The capsule could be used as a tool for monitoring the impact of one’s diet, and as a gut disorder diagnostic tool.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech Silicon Valley on February 26-27, 2018 at Stanford University. Speakers include:  Vinod Khosla – Justin Sanchez – Brian Otis – Bryan Johnson – Zhenan Bao – Nathan Intrator – Carla Pugh – Jamshid Ghajar – Mark Kendall – Robert Greenberg – Darin Okuda – Jason Heikenfeld – Bob Knight – Phillip Alvelda – Paul Nuyujukian –  Peter Fischer – Tony Chahine – Shahin Farshchi – Ambar Bhattacharyya – Adam D’Augelli – Juan-Pablo Mas – Michael Eggleston – Walter Greenleaf – Jacobo Penide – David Sarno – Peter Fischer

Registration rates increase – January 19th.

EEG + AI assists drivers in manual and autonomous cars

Nissan’s Brain-to-Vehicle (B2V) technology will enable vehicles to interpret signals from a driver’s brain.

The company describes two aspects of the system — prediction and detection, which depend on a driver wearing EEG electrodes:

Predicton: By detecting, via the brain, that the driver is about to move, including turning the steering wheel or pushing the accelerator pedal, B2V can begin the action more quickly.

Detection: When driver discomfort is detected, and the car is in autonomous mode, AI tools change the driving configuration or style.

Lucian Gheorghe, an innovation researcher Nissan, said that the system can use AR to adjust what the driver sees, and can turn the wheel or slow the car  0.2 to 0.5 seconds faster than the driver.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech Silicon Valley on February 26-27, 2018 at Stanford University. Speakers include:  Vinod Khosla – Justin Sanchez – Brian Otis – Bryan Johnson – Zhenan Bao – Nathan Intrator – Carla Pugh – Jamshid Ghajar – Mark Kendall – Robert Greenberg – Darin Okuda – Jason Heikenfeld – Bob Knight – Phillip Alvelda – Paul Nuyujukian –  Peter Fischer – Tony Chahine – Shahin Farshchi – Ambar Bhattacharyya – Adam D’Augelli – Juan-Pablo Mas – Michael Eggleston – Walter Greenleaf – Jacobo Penide – David Sarno

Registration rates increase today – January 5th.

Acoustic stimulation reduced PTSD symptoms in small study

Wake Forest’s Charles H. Tegeler has found that non-invasive brainwave mirroring technology significantly reduced symptoms of post-traumatic stress in soldiers.

High-resolution, relational, resonance-based, electroencephalic mirroring (HIRREM) is used as a non-invasive, closed-loop, acoustic stimulation approach. Algorithms translate brain frequencies into audible tones in real-time.

Tegeler compares this to an “acoustic mirror.” Through resonance between brain frequencies and acoustic stimulation, the brain makes self-adjustments to improve balance and reduce hyperarousal, with no conscious, cognitive activity. This supports the brain to reset stress response patterns that  caused by repetitive traumatic events.

In a small study, reductions in post-traumatic symptoms, including insomnia, depressive mood, and anxiety were observed in subjects for  six months after the HIRREM protocol.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech Silicon Valley on February 26-27, 2018 at Stanford University. Speakers include:  Vinod Khosla – Justin Sanchez – Brian Otis – Bryan Johnson – Zhenan Bao – Nathan Intrator – Carla Pugh – Jamshid Ghajar – Mark Kendall – Robert Greenberg – Darin Okuda – Jason Heikenfeld – Bob Knight – Phillip Alvelda – Paul Nuyujukian –  Peter Fischer – Tony Chahine – Shahin Farshchi – Ambar Bhattacharyya – Adam D’Augelli – Juan-Pablo Mas – Michael Eggleston – Walter Greenleaf – Jacobo Penide

Registration rates increase Friday, January 5th.

Contact-free blood pressure, heart and breath rate monitoring

Cornell’s Edwin Kan has developed a contact-free vital sign monitor  using radio-frequency signals and microchip tags. Blood pressure, heart rate and breath rate  are measured when radio waves bounce off the body and internal organs, and are detected by an electronic reader from a location anywhere in the room.  200 people can be monitored simultaneously.

According to Kan, the signal is as accurate as an ECG or blood-pressure cuff.  He believes that the technology could be used to measure bowel movement, eye movement and other internal mechanical motions.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech Silicon Valley on February 26-27, 2018 at Stanford University. Speakers include:  Vinod Khosla – Justin Sanchez – Brian Otis – Bryan Johnson – Zhenan Bao – Nathan Intrator – Carla Pugh – Jamshid Ghajar – Mark Kendall – Robert Greenberg – Darin Okuda – Jason Heikenfeld – Bob Knight – Phillip Alvelda – Paul Nuyujukian –  Peter Fischer – Tony Chahine – Shahin Farshchi – Ambar Bhattacharyya – Adam D’Augelli – Juan-Pablo Mas – Michael Eggleston – Walter Greenleaf – Jacobo Penide

Registration rates increase today, Friday, December 22nd.

Video: George Church on reading and writing brain structures and functions

Recorded at ApplySci’s Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech Boston conference on September 19th at the MIT Media Lab


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech Silicon Valley on February 26-27, 2018 at Stanford University. Speakers include:  Vinod Khosla – Justin Sanchez – Brian Otis – Bryan Johnson – Zhenan Bao – Nathan Intrator – Carla Pugh – Jamshid Ghajar – Mark Kendall – Robert Greenberg – Darin Okuda – Jason Heikenfeld – Bob Knight – Phillip Alvelda – Paul Nuyujukian –  Peter Fischer – Tony Chahine – Shahin Farshchi – Ambar Bhattacharyya – Adam D’Augelli – Juan-Pablo Mas – Michael Eggleston – Walter Greenleaf – Jacobo Penide

Single phone sensor tracks heart rate, HR variability, BP, oxygen saturation, ECG, PPG

 Sensio by MediaTek is a  biosensor that monitors  heart rate, heart rate variability,  blood pressure, peripheral oxygen saturation levels, ECG and PPG, from a smartphone, in 60 seconds.  This could allow continuous monitoring with out multiple sensors.

LEDs and a light sensitive sensor measure the absorption of red and infrared light from a  user’s fingertips. Touching a sensor allows the measurement of ECG and PPG waveforms.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech Silicon Valley on February 26-27, 2018 at Stanford University. Speakers include:  Vinod Khosla – Justin Sanchez – Brian Otis – Bryan Johnson – Zhenan Bao – Nathan Intrator – Carla Pugh – Jamshid Ghajar – Mark Kendall – Robert Greenberg – Darin Okuda – Jason Heikenfeld – Bob Knight – Phillip Alvelda – Paul Nuyujukian –  Peter Fischer – Tony Chahine – Shahin Farshchi – Ambar Bhattacharyya – Adam D’Augelli – Juan-Pablo Mas – Michael Eggleston – Walter Greenleaf – Jacobo Penide

Robots visualize actions, plan, with out human instruction

Sergey Levine and UC Berkeley colleagues have developed robotic learning technology that enables robots to visualize how different behaviors will affect the world around them, with out human instruction.  This ability to plan, in various scenarios,  could improve self-driving cars and robotic home assistants.

Visual foresight allows robots to predict what their cameras will see if they perform a particular sequence of movements. The robot can then learn to perform tasks without human help  or prior knowledge of physics, its environment or what the objects are.

The deep learning technology is based on dynamic neural advection. These  models predict how pixels in an image will move from one frame to the next, based on the robot’s actions. This has enabled robotic control based on video prediction to perform increasingly complex tasks.

Click to view UC Berkeley video


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech Silicon Valley on February 26-27, 2018 at Stanford University. Speakers include:  Vinod Khosla – Justin Sanchez – Brian Otis – Bryan Johnson – Zhenan Bao – Nathan Intrator – Carla Pugh – Jamshid Ghajar – Mark Kendall – Robert Greenberg – Darin Okuda – Jason Heikenfeld – Bob Knight – Phillip Alvelda – Paul Nuyujukian –  Peter Fischer – Tony Chahine – Shahin Farshchi – Ambar Bhattacharyya – Adam D’Augelli – Juan-Pablo Mas – Michael Eggleston – Walter Greenleaf

Glucose-monitoring smartphone case

GPhone, developed by UCSD’s Joe Wang and Patrick Mercier, is a  smartphone case and accompanying app that records and tracks glucose readings. It is 3D-printed and has a permanent, reusable sensor on its corner. Enzyme pellets magnetically attach to the sensor, and are stored in a 3D stylus on the side.

Users dispense a pellet from the stylus onto a bare strip on the case, activating the sensor.  A drop of blood is then put on the sensor strip.  Results are displayed on the screen, and the pellet is then discarded.

The next step is to integrate glucose sensing directly into the smartphone.  This is now in the proof of concept stage.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech Silicon Valley on February 26-27, 2018 at Stanford University. Speakers include:  Vinod Khosla – Justin Sanchez – Brian Otis – Bryan Johnson – Zhenan Bao – Nathan Intrator – Carla Pugh – Jamshid Ghajar – Mark Kendall – Robert Greenberg – Darin Okuda – Jason Heikenfeld – Bob Knight – Phillip Alvelda – Paul Nuyujukian –  Peter Fischer – Tony Chahine – Shahin Farshchi – Ambar Bhattacharyya – Adam D’Augelli – Juan-Pablo Mas – Michael Eggleston – Walter Greenleaf

Registration rates increase Friday, December 15th

Tiny sensor analyzes biomarkers in sweat

EPFL’s Adrian Ionescu  has developed a miniature chip  that analyzes biomarkers in sweat to understand a wearer’s health. It is the basis of a modular system that can measure sodium and potassium concentrations (that signal dehydration); body temperature and pH (to detect bacteria and risk factors for other illnesses); chlorine levels (as an early indication of cystic fibrosis); and other biomarkers that suggest fatigue and stress.

The chip contains four, 20 nanometer thick, extremely sensitive, silicon sensors. Each sensor is coated with a different material to detect different biomarkers. Two fluidic layers, between the chip and the user’s skin, pump sweat from the skin to the sensors.  The pump relies on capillary action, allowing it to run continuously, without electricity.


Sweat-sensing for health and disease prediction will be discussed by University of Cincinnati professor Jason Heikenfeld at ApplySci’s Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech conference, on February 26-27, 2018, at Stanford University.

Other speakers include:  Vinod Khosla – Justin Sanchez – Brian Otis – Bryan Johnson – Zhenan Bao – Nathan Intrator – Carla Pugh – Jamshid Ghajar – Mark Kendall – Robert Greenberg – Darin Okuda – Jason Heikenfeld – Bob Knight – Phillip Alvelda – Paul Nuyujukian –  Peter Fischer – Tony Chahine – Shahin Farshchi – Ambar Bhattacharyya – Adam D’Augelli – Juan-Pablo Mas – Michael Eggleston – Walter Greenleaf.

Registration rates increase Friday, December 8th

3D coronary artery model analyzes impact of blockages

HeartFlow FFR uses data from a CT scan to create a 3D model of the coronary arteries and analyze the impact that blockages have on heart flow, to determine whether a stent is necessary.  It replaces a test that uses direct measurement with an instrument inserted into the heart.

Standard practice is to push a thin wire  past a blockage in a patient’s coronary artery, using a small sensor on the tip to detect whether the build-up has significantly reduced blood flow. A study of 600,000  patients at 1,100 hospitals showed that  this invasive procedure proves unnecessary about 58 percent of the time. The wire either finds that there is no blockage present or that it is not severe enough to require a stent.

The company has published multiple studies showing that both methods produce similarly accurate results. Heartflow FFR measures blood pressure throughout the coronary arteries rather than in just one location.


Join ApplySci at Wearable Tech + Digital Health + Neurotech Silicon Valley on February 26-27, 2018 at Stanford University. Speakers include:  Vinod Khosla – Justin Sanchez – Brian Otis – Bryan Johnson – Zhenan Bao – Nathan Intrator – Carla Pugh – Jamshid Ghajar – Mark Kendall – Robert Greenberg – Darin Okuda – Jason Heikenfeld – Bob Knight – Phillip Alvelda – Paul Nuyujukian –  Peter Fischer – Tony Chahine – Shahin Farshchi – Ambar Bhattacharyya – Adam D’Augelli – Juan-Pablo Mas – Michael Eggleston

Registration rates increase Friday, December 8th